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Saxophone

The saxophone is a wind instrument with one reed and it’s the most recent among the classical instruments. It was invented by Adolphe Sax in the 19th century, aiming to sound as loud as brass instruments (which sound is produced through lip vibration) and as versatile as woodwinds (which sound is produced through reeds or mouthpieces). It was created with different variations, having some of them been through time. The most popular is the Tenor Sax, but it is also common to find soprano, alto and baritone saxophones. It is known by its metal sound mixed with the velvety sound of the clarinet. The challenge of producing a beautiful sound in the saxophone will be overcome each day mastering the position of your mouth in the mouthpiece, and the way you control the air flow through the reed. Your fingers will become more agile too and soon you will know the place of each finger on their respective keys, corresponding to the music notes. Listen to the timbres of the different saxophones:

The Tenor Saxophone music sheets are written on the treble clef but the saxophone is a transposing instrument. It means that the note written in the saxophone’s score is not the note produced by the saxophone. This happens because the note range of the saxophone is too high for the bass clef and too low for the treble clef and so, to simplify the reading and writing of the scores they write the notes in a more comfortable place. In the case of the tenor saxophone, it’s C sounds a B flat in reality. That is, the saxophone’s C is one step lower than the real C. Plus, although the tenor saxophone sheets are written on the treble clef, its pitch corresponds to an octave lower than the treble clef.

A musician who plays the tenor sax will easily play the other saxes, but also other reed instruments like the clarinet (with a similar mouthpiece) and also the bassoon or the oboe.

You can start learning the saxophone with a saxophone from the Cascais Music School. Check for more information at our Shop.

Meet the Saxophone Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Bassoon

The bassoon is a wind instrument with double reed which produces low pitch notes. It is known by its dry but very rich sound. The challenge of producing a beautiful sound on the bassoon will be overcome each day by mastering the way you position your mouth in the double reed and in the way you control the air flow through it. Your fingers will also become agile with practice and you will quickly know the place of each finger on their respective keys. Listen to the sound of the bassoon:

The bassoon music sheets are written in the bass clef. Within the bassoon family, there are three varieties: the common bassoon, the soprano bassoon (not in use anymore) and the contrabassoon, lower than the bassoon. A bassoonist can easily play these variants of bassoon, and also other reed instruments such as the oboe (also with double reed), the clarinet and the saxophone.

You can start learning the bassoon with a bassoon from the Cascais Music School. Check for more information at our Shop.

Meet the Bassoon Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Oboe

The oboe is a wind instrument with double reed which produces medium to high pitch notes. It is known by its nasal and intense sound. The challenge of producing a beautiful sound on the oboe will be overcome each day by mastering the way you position your mouth in the double reed and in the way you control the air flow through it. Your fingers will also become agile with practice and you will quickly know the place of each finger on their respective keys. Listen to the sound of the oboe:

The oboe music sheets are written in the treble clef. Within the oboes family, there are ten different types of oboe. The most common oboe has baroque, classical and romantic variants. Then we have the Piccolo Oboe (the highest pitched oboe), the Oboe d’Amore, the Oboe da Caccia, the English Horn, the Baritone Oboe, the Bass Oboe and the Heckelphone, all of these pitching lower than the common oboe. An oboist can easily play any of these oboes, as other reed instruments such as the bassoon (also with double reed), and also the clarinet or the saxophone.

You can start learning the oboe with an oboe from the Cascais Music School. Check for more information at our Shop.

Meet the Oboe Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Clarinet

The clarinet is a wind instrument with one reed, which produces low to medium pitch notes. It is known by its full and soft velvet sound. The challenge of producing a beautiful sound on the clarinet will be overcome each day by mastering the way you position your mouth in the mouthpiece, and the way you control the air flow through the reed. Your fingers will also become agile with practice and you will quickly know the place of each finger on their respective keys. Listen to the sound of the clarinet:

The soprano clarinet music sheets are written in the treble clef, but the clarinet is a transposing instrument. It means that the note written in the clarinet’s score is not the note produced by the clarinet. In this case, for the most common type of the Clarinet in B flat, the clarinet’s C sounds a B flat in reality. That is, the clarinet’s C is one step lower than the real C.

Within the clarinets family, there are ten different types of clarinet. The most common is the soprano clarinet en B flat, but there are three more clarinets in a higher pitch and six more in a lower pitch. A musician who plays the clarinet can easily play the other clarinets, but also other reed instruments such as the saxophone which has a similar mouthpiece, and also the oboe and the bassoon.

You can start learning the clarinet with a clarinet from the Cascais Music School. Check for more information at our Shop.

Meet the Clarinet Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Singing Voice

The art of Singing uses the only living music instrument in the Planet: the voice. Everyone can sing, although not all people were encouraged to do so. Yet, the vocal chords are a very delicate and have to be very well taken care of, to last many years and healthy.

For being so delicate, the voice is worked according to the age. The techniques learned as an adult are not the same used with a children’s voice. And during the transition from children’s voice to adult’s voice, there is a particular and specific work to that phase.

On this discipline, each student will learn in which register their voice has the best performance: Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano and Contralto for women and children, and Tenor, Baritone and Bass for men.

Meet the different voices within the lyrical singing and presenting the voice in its whole potentiality:

Children:

Soprano:

Mezzo-Soprano:

Alto:

Tenor:

Baritone:

Bass:

At the singing classes you learn the best techniques so that your voice stands out with all of its qualities. And with those techniques you will have all the freedom to sing in every styles, or to specialize on your favourite one.

Depending on your vocal register, sheet music may be written on the treble clef (female, children or tenor voices) or in the bass clef (male voices).

Meet the Singing Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Instruments Ensemble

Playing an instrument is great but playing instruments with friends is awesome. Here, the hearing is improved and finely tuned among all the musicians. You overcome the challenges of keeping the tempo, of following the dynamics and working together on the expression, and of preparing the musics on time for each rehearsal.
The earlier we get used to play in ensemble, the quicker we improve our learning:

The Instruments Ensemble discipline is intended for students attending aan instrument discipline and who wish to be part of a chamber music ensemble.
The Instruments Ensemble may substitute the Choir discipline.

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Choir

A regular choral activity promotes the harmonic sensibility of the hearing and develops autonomy, enabling the chorister to keep his melodic line independently from the other voices.

The choral practice is an intense musical experience as the choir grows technically as a group. It is also a fundamental skill for every musician (and human being). At the choir, students read scores and write their own annotations according to the conductor’s instructions.

There are many types of choirs, varying in dimension and number of voices. There are symphonic choirs which can reach hundreds of choristers, and there are choirs of 16 people. There are female and male choirs. There are amateur choirs, school and university choirs, church choirs, neighbourhood choirs. There are choirs for every taste and no one gets tired of it!

Check below some examples of choirs around the world.

Youth choir:

University choir:

Adult choir:

A virtual choir:

A symphonic choir:

At last, learn here how a choir makes a difference in the musical experience of so many: 

At the Cascais Music School we have the Children’s Choir (5-9 y.o.) and the Youth Choir (10-18 y.o.). This is a group discipline and includes vocal technique preparation.

Apply at he Secretary!

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Fees and Application

The candidate must fill an application form which puts him automatically in the waiting list. This form has no costs and does not compromise neither the student nor the Music School. The application can be filled in paper and submitted at the Secretary, or online on the form below.  Having a vacancy, the Carer is contacted by the Director of Pedagogy's office which manages vacancies and schedules, in order to schedule the admission tests for the pretended course.

A course at Cascais Music School has the duration of 10 months by default, according to the official school calendar. The application form is only valid after payment of the corresponding fees, and during the period  set for that purpose. Applications submitted after this period are subject to the existing vacancies and to the available schedules of the Music School, classes and teachers.

Application

Documents needed:

• 1 student's photo: passport type, colours and up to date

• Original Student's identification document for verification 

• Original Student's tax identification document for verification

• Original Carer's identification document for verification 

Application Fees

Application on the 1st term:

Registration + Insurance: 72€  (new students)
Renewal of registration + Insurance: 52€ 
(students enrolled in the previous school year)

Application on the 2nd term:

Registration + Insurance: 52€ 

Application on the 3rd term:

Registration + Insurance: 32€

Fees

Payment Modalities:

a) 10 monthly payments: 2 monthly payments payed with
the registration (September + June) + 8 monthly payments
payed on the remaining months (from October to May).

b) Payment in advance of 5 months = 3% Discount

c) Payment in advance of 10 months = 5% Discount

Deadlines

All payments must be due from day 1 to 10 of each month. Payments after this period are subject to a fine and have no discount on that month.

Registration annulment

To quit the course has the cost of 1 monthly payment.

 

Reductions

Discounts for siblings:

Application on the 1st term:
Registration +Insurance: 42€  (sibling's first enrollment)
Registration renewal +Insurance: 29€  (sibling enrolled on previous year)

Application on the 2nd term:
Registration +Insurance: 32€ 

Application on the 3rd term:
Registration +Insurance: 22€ 

Fees:

5% discount on first sibling in all payment methods.
10% discount from the second sibling in all payment methods.


These reductions do not apply for students who already benefit the support from the Portuguese Ministry of Culture and Education or from the Cascais Music School.

Useful Documents





 

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Transverse Flute

The transverse flute produces medium to high pitch notes, and we usually hear it playing quick sequences of  many notes. The challenge of producing a beautiful sound on the flute will be overcome each day, mastering the way your blow behaves in each note, while your fingers get used to their respective keys. Listen to the timbre of the flute:

The sheet music of the transverse flute is written in the Treble Clef, although there are flutes which can reach lower notes (alto and bass flutes) and others which reach higher notes (piccolo). Mastering the transverse flute, you will be able to learn and play these instruments from this same family.

You can start learning the transverse flute with a transverse flute from the Cascais Music School. Check for more information at our Shop.

Meet the Transverse Flute Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Piano

The piano is with no doubt the most popular classical instrument. It’s an instrument where the maths of music is visually clear, with all the notes displayed from octave to octave just waiting for our fingers. And it is an instrument where tuning is not of your responsibility. Each key plays always the same note regardless of how experienced is the hand playing it.

On the other hand, the piano is the polyphony instrument by excellence: on the piano you play much more than the melody. Your experience on the piano will evolve from simple melodies until you you play great pieces, where each finger plays with perfect autonomy. The art of producing a beautiful sound on the piano is the art of dancing with your hands. The strength and speed with which the keys are played hides more mastery than you imagine!

With the piano you will learn to read not one but two clefs: one for the right hand and other for the left hand. Generally, the right hand plays on the treble clef and the left on the bass clef, although you will find some pieces where both your hands travel through the whole keyboard, from the basses to the trebles.

Playing the piano, you will easily learn how to play other keyboard instruments such as the harpsichord, the organ or the accordion keyboard.

This is, though, one of the loneliest instruments for being so complete on its possibilities… and also for not being portable. You can’t just take it to a friend’s house for a jam session.

Furthermore, while in the orchestra there is room for many melodic instruments (even many of the same), the piano is not part of the usual formation. It comes most of the times as a soloist instrument. For that reason, many pianists seek whenever possible to play in duets, trios or other chamber ensembles.

In compensation, pianists have a fundamental role accompanying choirs and voice practice in general, a work which develops very well the musical hearing and, at the same time, gives you freedom to be a soloist and to explore your creativity.

Get to know our Piano Teachers from Cascais Music School.

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Classical Guitar

The Classical Guitar is a plucked strings instrument which means that the sound is produced by the fingers plucking the strings. Its six strings produce notes from low to medium pitch, and you can either play melodies on a single string as to play in all the strings simultaneously through the well known guitar chords. But with the experience you develop in the guitar you will learn to combine melodies with chords, playing more and more beautiful and complex pieces. The classical guitar is played seated for a correct posture, and as you evolve in your practice, you will learn the best techniques to produce the most beautiful sound in each string and for each note:

The guitar sheet music is usually written in the treble clef, although the notes produced by the guitar are one octave lower. Playing the Classical Guitar, it will be easier to play other plucked strings instruments such as the Acoustic Guita and the Electric Guitar, which have the same tuning, or the Lute, the Banjo, the Mandolin, the Portuguese Guitar, the Bass, the Cavaquinho or the Ukulele, and many others in which the right hand technique has the biggest changes (besides the different tunings).

You can begin to learn the classical guitar with a classical guitar from the Cascais Music School. Check for more information at our Shop.

Meet the Classical Guitar Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Double Bass

The Double Bass is the biggest bow instrument and also the one who reaches the lowest notes. Its sound is produced through the friction of the bow on its thick strings or through the pizzicato. It belongs to the family of the violin, the viola and the cello, although its shape is more similar to the viola da gamba, a baroque instrument. For its dimension, it is played either standing or seating in a high bench. Likewise as the other strings, you will learn to adapt the bow pressure on each string, producing the typical deep and loud sound of the double bass:

The double bass is also a popular instrument in jazz and world music, where its versatility is explored in many alternative ways:

The double bass sheet music is written in the bass clef, although the double bass produces notes one octave below than the written ones.

You can begin to learn the double bass with a double bass from the Cascais Music School. Check for more information at our Shop.

Meet the Double Bass Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Viola

The Viola is known for its deep and full sound, producing low notes within a small bodied instrument. In the orchestra, it has the fundamental role of approaching the high and the low pitches from the other string instruments, playing intermediate notes and so, completing the palette of sounds and harmonies. It’s presence is very discrete and sometimes it’s hard to distinguish among the other instruments, but you will notice for sure when it’s missing! It is like the secret element of the strings family, uniting and bestowing identity to the harmony.

The viola sheet music is written in the C clef, a pitch between the bass and the treble clefs.

You can begin to learn the viola with a viola from the Cascais Music School. Check for more information at our Shop.

Meet the Viola Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Cello

The Cello is an instrument whose sound is produced through the friction of the bow on the strings or through the pizzicato. It has a lower pitch than the violin and the viola, but higher than the double bass, all instruments from the same family. Because of its dimensions, one plays the cello seated (as the viola da gamba) and, like the other instruments from the same family, you will learn to adapt the bow pressure on each string, producing the very characterizing velvet sound of the cello:

The cello sheet music is written in the bass clef, although there are cases when you may find sheets in the C clef.

You can begin to learn the cello with a cello from the Cascais Music School. Check for more information at our Shop.

Meet the Cello Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Violin

The violin produces a medium to high pitch sound, with its characteristic long notes full of vibratto. What, you don’t know what vibratto is? Well, we can tell you it is one of the many techniques you will learn while playing the violin. The challenge of producing a beautiful sound on your violin will be overcome each day by mastering the bow movements in each string, while your left hand fingers get used to position automatically on their places. Listen to the sound of the violin:

The violin sheet music is written in the treble clef and many musicians who started playing the violin learned other bow instruments with more ease, such as viola or even the cello, the double bass or viola da gamba. All these instruments produce lower pitch sounds than the violin.

You can begin to learn the violin with a violin from the Cascais Music School. Check for more information at our Shop.

Meet the Violin Teachers from the Cascais Music School.

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Ivan Knezevic

Ivan Knezevic was born in Belgrade and found his love for music early in life. As a four year old, he joined the Belgrade Choir “Kolibri”. At the age of six, he decided all of his own accord that he was going to learn to play the violin. At a special school for music in Belgrade he received, in addition to advanced violin lessons, his first taste of chamber music and orchestral playing. Since then he has played with great fervor in numerous established ensembles, nurturing his endless willingness to share musical ideas and interpretations with others.

First prizes at national and international competitions have enabled him to continue his career abroad. At just 20 years old, he was invited to Chile as principal 1st violin of the Teatro Municipal. In Germany, he has also taken up the position of principal 1st violin in Hagen and Essen. Additionally, he played first violin for three years in the “Evenos String Quartet”, working with internationally known musicians whilst touring all over Europe.

Ivan loves sharing his musical experiences with others and passing on his knowledge to the younger generation. He has taught at the Cuprjia Musical School for especially gifted children in Serbia, as well as been a lecturer for chamber music at the college of music in Belgrade. His masterclasses both in Serbia and Greece are famous for their vibrant and spirited style.

Ivan’s numerous arrangements have enabled ICstring’s repertoire to overcome musical boundaries, providing a seemingly unendless range of possibilities.

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Caroline Busser

Caroline Busser, cellist of French and German origin, was born in Munich. As a five year old, she received her first music lessons, learned the flute, violin and piano before she fell in love with the cello, which would fascinate and accompany her through her musical career. With the sonorous sound of the cello that is most similar to the human voice, you could “tell” stories to the public. In youth orchestra and chamber music ensembles she discovered to communicate with others through music, “carrying” the sound with the bass voice, being part of an accomplished piece of art.
She made this “first love” her profession, practicing and soon winning awards such as the National Cello Award Germany. Her studies led her to the Music Conservatories Strasbourg, Detmold and Munich where she played her final degree concert with great success. Prof. Bernard Greenhouse, one of the most renowned chamber music professors, invited her for a private scholarship to the United States. Under scholarship of the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra, Caroline performed in the most prestigious concert halls under some of the most prominent conductors such as Zubin Mehta, Lorin Maazel and Christian Thielemann. 2013 she became the Principal Cellist of Pfalztheater Kaiserslautern.

The most fulfilling thing thus far in Caroline’s eventful career has been chamber music, and she wants to spread the joy it has given her playing concerts with her duo “IC Strings” and the project Music Connects Europe.

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Tiago Paraíso

Tiago Filipe Santos Paraiso was born in Leiria, Portugal in 1983. At the age of 8 started his music education at the S.A.M.P. art school in Pousos, Leiria. He was 17 when he entered the Escola Profissional de Artes da Beira Interior to study bassoon with the teacher João Brito. After three years he was admitted to join the bassoon studio at the Instituto Jean Piaget and he graduated after studying the last two years of his academic education with teacher Eduardo Sirtori at the Évora University, Portugal.
Among the masterclasses he attended at the International Music festival and School, in Saarburg (Germany), the Summer Course in Caldas da Rainha with the teacher Hughes Kesteman, the 18th edition of Curso Internacional de Aperfeiçoamento para Jovens Músicos do INATEL in Portalegre. He participated the Bassoon Masterclasses given by Pierre Oliver Martens, Rui Lopes and Afonso Venturieri. Tiago also performed as a member of the workshop of Orquestra Sinfónica do Alto Minho, conducted by maestro Márcio Pereira and the 1st Workshop of Orquestra de Jovens Músicos conducted by Henrique Piloto and Pedro Figueiredo. He performed as an orchestra member in the Conducting Masterclasses by prestigious artists like Maestro Jean Sebastian Bérrou and Mitchell J. Fennell at the Conservatório Nacional in Lisbon.
Tiago found out about his passion for jazz when he attended the Jazz Workshops given by Prof. Pedro Moreira at the Instituto Piaget. Since then, he is been working and experimenting to explore the unusual expressive potential of the Bassoon in Jazz.
Tiago was often invited to be a part of several professional and semiprofessional ensembles like the European Union Wind Orchestra, the Orquestra Sinfónica Nacional of São Carlos, Orquestra Clássica do Sul, Sinfonieta de Lisboa, played as 1st bassoon at the Orquestra da Compahia de Ópera Portuguesa, Ensemble Moderno that belongs to the Conservatório Nacional in Lisbon, Orquestra da Escola Profissional da Beira Interior, Institute Piaget Orchestra, Nossa Senhora do Cabo Students Orchestra, Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa Orchestra, Wind Orchestra of the Conservatório Nacional de Lisboa and played at the orchestra of the musical Sweeney Todd.
As a member of these groups he performed high profile repertoire in most of the European big cities and recorded a number of CDs and concerts for the Nacional Radio RDP-Antena 2. He enjoyed working with very prestigious conductors, among them, Cesário Costa, Rui Pinheiro, Vasco Pierce Azevedo, Alberto Roque, Roberto Peres, Marko Letonja, Jan Cober, Nikolay Lalov, Christopher Bochmann, Francesco Lentini, James Liu, João Paulo Santos and Rui Massena.
He played as a soloist with the Orquestra de Câmara de Cascais e Oeiras and the Institute Piaget Orchestra.
Tiago Paraíso is every week performing in Portugal most important stages, but most frequently in Cascais as a member of the Orquestra de Câmara de Cascais e Oeiras and at Sinfónica de Cascais, where he is full member. In Lisbon, Tiago often appears with the Ensemble de Palhetas Duplas of which he is a founding member.
Passing on professional and artistic experiences to the younger ones is very important for Tiago Paraíso. He is a dedicated teacher at the Cascais and Palmela Conservatories. He has also taught a Masterclasse orchestral playing such at 1º Estágio de Banda Sinfónica da Beira Interior.
He is finishing the Masters in Music Teaching at Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa.

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Rui Teixeira

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André Gaio Pereira

A soloist with regular recital and concerto appearances, a keen chamber musician and orchestral player, André Gaio Pereira is a Portuguese violinist residing in London.

André was nominated Young Musician of the Year in Portugal in 2017 and consequently performed Shostakovich Violin Concerto in A minor with Gulbenkian Orchestra live for national television and radio. He has also appeared with Metropolitana Orchestra and Algarve Orchestra and this season will make his debut with the Portuguese Symphony Orchestra and Portuguese Philharmonic Orchestra amongst other major orchestras in Portugal.

The highest graduand at the Royal Academy of Music 2015/16, André obtained 1st in Young Artists Competition in Portugal in 2017 and 2nd prize and Bach Prize at Vasco Barbosa Competition in 2016. He has attended masterclasses with Igor Oistrakh, Maxim Vengerov, Zakhar Bron, Anna Chumachenko and Gyorgy Pauk, and took part in the prestigious Kronberg Masterclasses (2011) and the IMS Prussia Cove (2016).

As a chamber musician André has appeared at the Wigmore Hall and the Cadogan Hall as the 1st violinist of the Tagus Quartet and in collaborations with the Nash Ensemble and the Doric Quartet. He was also invited for festivals such as Harmos, Mendelssohn on Mull, Oxford Lieder Festival, Marvão International Music Festival and Festa da Música.

André is currently pursuing his Masters degree at the Royal Academy of Music under the guidance of Levon Chilingirian. At the Academy he has led the Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Sir Mark Elder, Semyon Bychkov and Edward Gardner. He also appears with the London Symphony Orchestra and the English Chamber Orchestra.

He is generously supported in his studies by the ABRSM, Help Musicians UK, Countess of Munster Musical Trust and Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation.

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Alto Patrocínio / High Patronage

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